Democratization and constitutional choices in Czecho-Slovakia, Hungary, and Poland, 1989-1991

by Arend Lijphart

Publisher: Center for German and European Studies, University of California in Berkeley, CA

Written in English
Published: Pages: 15 Downloads: 565
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Places:

  • Czechoslovakia,
  • Hungary,
  • Poland

Subjects:

  • Representative government and representation.,
  • Proportional representation.,
  • Democratization.,
  • Czechoslovakia -- Politics and government -- 1989-1992.,
  • Hungary -- Politics and government -- 1989-,
  • Poland -- Politics and government -- 1989-

Edition Notes

Statementby Arend Lijphart ; with comments by Giuseppe di Palma.
SeriesWorking paper / Center for German and European Studies ;, 2.2, Working paper (University of California, Berkeley. Center for German and European Studies) ;, 2.2.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsJF1051 .L55 1992
The Physical Object
Pagination15, [7], 5 p. ;
Number of Pages15
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1515569M
LC Control Number93200323

The Revolutions of (also known as the Fall of Communism, the Collapse of Communism, the Revolutions of Eastern Europe and the Autumn of Nations) were the revolutions which overthrew the communist states in various Central and Eastern European countries. The events began in Poland in , and continued in Hungary, East Germany, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia and Romania. One . Presidentialism and parliamentarism are two major forms of democratic government systems. Nearly all political systems in the world are modeled on them. (Mahler, ) The former is best respresented by the United States while the latter one is represented by the United Kingdom.   Their constitutional choices were constrained by tradition. Czechoslovakia (or what became later Czechoslovakia) comes first, then Hungary, Poland, Bulgaria and Romania. That ranking has not changed over the last one hundred fifty years. Rebellious Civil Society: Popular Protest and Democratic Consolidation in Poland, with (Jan Kubik.   Large parts of Europe had been profoundly transformed as a result of the World War I. * The German Empire disintegrated * The Austro-Hungarian Empire disintegrated * The Russian Empire disintegrated It was a massive defeat for monarchy as an ideol.

In five country-specific reports, senior scholars provide detailed accounts of the talks in Bulgaria, Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, and the German Democratic Republic. Also included is an essay on the political factors underlying the failure of negotiations between reform groups and the Chinese regime, providing an illuminating counterpoint. By Claire Swinko, Washington. Poland, an EU member country with a rich post-Soviet era history of upholding democratic values, has come under fire in recent months for its “democratic backsliding”— the so-called reversion toward authoritarianism based on non-democratic values and lack of respect for the rule of law and basic fundamental freedoms. Politics of Hungary takes place in a framework of a parliamentary representative democratic Prime Minister is the head of government of a pluriform multi-party system, while the President is the head of state and holds a largely ceremonial position.. Executive power is exercised by the government. Legislative power is vested in both the government and the parliament. The Polish People's Republic (Polish: Polska Rzeczpospolita Ludowa, PRL) was a country in Central Europe that existed from to , and the predecessor of the modern Republic of a population of approximately million inhabitants near the end of its existence, it was the most populous communist and Eastern Bloc country in Europe after the Soviet Union.

book offers a novel and profound analysis of the post development of constitutionalism in poland societal ethos similarly the prospects for democracy in hungary and the other newly independent states constitutional democracy in the newly independent states of central and eastern europe following the.   In elections with only one slate, the Communists win full control and a new Constitution is adopted declaring Czechoslovakia a people's democracy. June 6, . This research provided the foundation for Melone's book Creating Parliamentary Government: The Transition to Democracy in Bulgaria. The collection also includes copies of journal articles from East European Constitutional Review on Bulgarian and Eastern European democratization and politics used for Melone's teaching and research. -Working within crisis of democracy theory to shed light on Israeli democracy -Experiencing independent research Attendance requirements(%): 80% + active participation Teaching arrangement and method of instruction: Lectures, workshop, team-work, discussions and presentations.

Democratization and constitutional choices in Czecho-Slovakia, Hungary, and Poland, 1989-1991 by Arend Lijphart Download PDF EPUB FB2

Czecho-Slovakia, Hungary and Poland have made different constitutional choices with regard to their new electoral systems (ranging from extreme proportional representation to a moderately majoritarian system) and with regard to parliamentarism-presidentialism (ranging from a semi-presidential to a pure parliamentary system).Cited by: Downloadable.

Czecho-Slovakia, Hungary and Poland have made different constitutional choices with regard to their new electoral systems (ranging from extreme proportional representation to a moderately majoritarian system) and with regard to parliamentarism-presidentialism (ranging from a semi-presidential to a pure parliamentary system).

Stein Rokkan's two explanations of the adoption of. Using an interdisciplinary and comparative approach, the book analyses the historical emergence of powerful constitutional institutions in the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania and Slovakia. The author argues that the democratic promise of largely lost out to a technocratic and top-down view of judicial control of politics – a.

The argument is substantiated through a cross-regional comparison of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, and Poland.

Discover the world's research 17+ million members. In book: The Handbook of Electoral System Choice (pp) Democratization and Constitutional Choices in CzechoSlovakia, Hungary and Poland Czecho-Slovakia, Hungary and Poland Author: Petr Kopecký.

Developing democracy: comparative research in honour of J.F.P. Blondel. [Jean Blondel; Ian Budge;] Graham WilsonDemocratization and Constitutional Choices in Czechoslovakia, Hungary and Poland - Arend LijphartPopular Political Organizations and Democratic Development - Joe Foweraker A Comparison of Spain and MexicoPART FIVE: NEW.

39 Lijphart, Arend, “Democratization and Constitutional Choices in Czechoslovakia, Hungary and Poland, –,” Journal of Theoretical Politics 4, no. 2 (). 40 Prague Television, November 4,in FBIS-EEU–, November 7,p. Democratization and Constitutional Choices in Czechoslovakia, Hungary and Poland - Arend Lijphart Popular Political Organizations and Democratic Development - Joe Foweraker A Comparison of Spain and Mexico PART FIVE: NEW DEMOCRACIES: ASSESSMENTS AND PROGNOSES Democracy and the Rule of Law in Latin America - Christian Anglade.

“ Democratization and Constitutional Choices in Czecho-Slovakia, Hungary, and Poland, –,” Journal of Theoretical Politics 4 (2): – Lijphart, Arend. Carlos Santiago Nino, The Constitution of Deliberative Democracy (New Haven, CT and London: Yale University Press, ); John Reitz, ‘Constitutionalism and the Rule of Law’, in Robert D.

Grey (ed.), Democratic Theory and Post-communist Change (London and New York: Prentice Hall, ), pp– The events of the full-blown revolution began in Poland in and continued in Hungary, East Germany, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia and Romania. One feature common to most of these developments was the extensive use of campaigns of civil resistance, demonstrating popular opposition to the continuation of one-party rule and contributing to the.

CZECHO. SLOVAKIA: CONSTITUTIONAL DISAPPOINTMENTS Katarina Mathernoval INTRODUCTION People often view the Czech and Slovak Federative Republic (CSFR), Hungary, and Poland jointly as being countries of the former Eastern bloc most likely to achieve democratic political and market ec-onomic reform.

“Democratization and Constitutional Choices in Czecho-Slovakia, Hungary, and Poland, –” Journal of Theoretical Politics () – Google Scholar. Lijphart, Arend. ‘Democratization and Constitutional Choices in Czechoslovakia, Hungary, and Poland, ’ Journal of Theoretical Politics 4(2).

Taagepera, Rein. ‘How Electoral Systems Matter for Democratization’ Democratization 5(3): Sarah Birch. State-building without a bureaucracy: the case of the United Kingdom / R.A.W. Rhodes --The Westminster model in comparative perspective / Graham Wilson --Democratization and constitutional choices in Czechoslovakia, Hungary and Poland, / Arend Lijphart --Popular political organization and democratization: a comparison of Spain and.

See Arend Lijphart, Democratization and Constitutional Choices in CzechoSlovakia, Hungary and Poland, –, Sisyphus Social Studies, I, no. 8 (), 86– Google Scholar The fall of the communist governments in Czechoslovakia, Hungary, and Poland occurred four years after the a. end of the Cold War b.

election of Mikhail Gorbachev c. Velvet Revolution d. Soviet Union began the process of destalinization. Czechoslovakia in did not really have to build and learn democracy.

Although democracy in the Austro-Hungarian Empire left much to be desired, there was a multiparty system, a constitutional monarchy, and the ‘Rechtsstaat’. And there was a civil society. the title of Hitler's book Mein Kampf in English is a.

well-being b. my country bythe only eastern European country that was still a democracy was a. Poland b. Hungary c. Yugoslavia d. Czechoslovakia. Czechoslovakia.

Hitler's main method for achieving lebensraum was to a. attack Jews b. conquer other countries c. form a secret.

Czechoslovakia, or Czecho-Slovakia (/ ˌ tʃ ɛ k oʊ s l oʊ ˈ v æ k i ə,-k ə-,-s l ə-,-ˈ v ɑː-/; Czech and Slovak: Československo, Česko-Slovensko), was a sovereign state in Central Europe that existed from Octoberwhen it declared its independence from the Austro-Hungarian Empire, until its peaceful dissolution into the Czech Republic and Slovakia on 1 January Democracy in plural societies: a comparative exploration: Democracy in the twenty-first century: can we be optimistic.

Democratization and constitutional choices in Czecho-Slovakia, Hungary, and Poland, - Democrazie in transizione: Demokraatia mustrid: valitsemisvormid ja nende toimimine kolmekümne kuues riigis. In andEastern European Communist regimes and opposition groups conducted a series of roundtable talks to peacefully negotiate the abolition of authoritarian rule and the transition to democratic governance.

This volume documents that unprecedented process of national reinvention and constitution making. These essays capture the historical circumstances of these countries—their. However, the crisis of democracy in Poland and Hungary is a welcome pretext for all those who believe that EU’s eastern enlargement was a mistake and dream of a small EU.

As such, the efforts of European – particularly German – leaders not to let a dispute over the rule of law endanger EU unity deserve credit. Embedded and defective democracies. Democratization: Vol. 11, Consolidated & Defective Democracy. Problems of Regime Change, pp.

*Hayden, Ralston. New European Constitutions: In Poland, Czechoslovakia, and the Kingdom of the Serbs, Croates and Slovenes, American Political Science Review 16 (2): Lijphart, A.

Democratization and Constitutional Choices in Czecho-Slovakia, Hungary and Poland Journal of Theoretical Politics 4 (2): Czechoslovak history - Czechoslovak history - Czechoslovakia (–92): When the new country of Czechoslovakia was proclaimed on Oct.

28,its leaders were still in exile. Masaryk was chosen as president on Novem while he was still in the United States; he did not arrive in Prague until December.

Beneš, the country’s foreign minister, was in Paris for the upcoming peace. Covering all key Eastern European states and their history right up to the collapse of communism, this second edition of Eastern Europe in the Twentieth Century – And After is a comprehensive political history of Eastern Europe taking in the whole of the century and the geographical area.

Focusing on the attempt to create and maintain a functioning democracy, this new edition now:. 6 See, e.g., Arend Lijphart, Democratization and Constitutional Choices in Czecho- Slovakia, Hungary and Poland: –, 4 J.

T HEORETICAL P OL.() (noting that changes to “fundamental constitutional structure” are rare in established. Such fierce rhetoric would be more believable if the Visegrad countries — Hungary, Poland, Slovakia, and the Czech Republic — weren’t also among the largest net recipients of EU funds.

February Constitutional Design Reading: Developments in Central and East European Politics. Chapter 8. Lijphart, Arend. \Democratization and Constitutional Choices in Czecho-Slovakia, Hungary and Poland " Journal of Theoretical Politics 4(2): February Electoral Systems Reading.

Lijphart, Arend (). Democratization and Constitutional Choices in Czechoslovakia, Hungary and Poland, – Kap 12 i Ian Budge & David McKay (red): Developing democracy.

London: 16 s. Mair, Peter (). What is different about Post-Communist party systems? Kap. 8 i Peter Mair: Party system change. Approaches and.HUNGARY. Box 1. Constitutional draft, (in Hungarian) Constitution of the Rep.

of Hungary (undated) (in English) Of Poland, Democratic Union (UD) versionAp (in Polish)99 & to the Republic of Slovenia Constitution, (in Slovenian) Box 2 Financial legislation (in Slovenian).liberal constitutional democracy in the newly independent states of central and eastern europe.

racy albania bulgaria czechoslovakia hungary poland romania and yugoslavia six of the seven are process that entails both critical choices of new institutions and the rooting of those institutions in the.